Monday, December 05, 2005

I usually avoid writing about work, but I couldn't pass this one up.

This is from a transcript of a symposium on glaucoma surgery (from which I am expected to produce a coherent manuscript):

"Could nonpenetrating glaucoma procedures be the next step in that evolution, whether we are talking about using rooster comb to inflate to outflow channels, or using a pork rind to maintain filtration through the sacrectomy route."

Can you guess which parts are the transcriber's mistakes?? It may be harder than you think.

8 comments:

karaokekitty17 said...

Oh my God! Who writes this stuff? If they didn't understand something, they should have left a blank or something. What's the point of writing a bunch of senseless phrases? Unless the use of pork rinds is the new hot trend in opthalmic surgery!

fishlamp said...

Is it just me, or is science becoming more and more primative lately? Isn't it supposed to progress forwards?

Kat E said...

The scary thing is, there's a chance that the "rooster comb" thing might actually be correct (there's a product they use in surgery that can be made from rooster comb). Which makes it even harder to figure this shit out! I'm pretty sure the pork rind thing is a mistake, though these docs come up with all kinds of weird names for their surgical techniques, so you never know.

BeckyBumbleFuck said...

Hey. If someone's gonna put a pork rind near my eye, I wanna know NOW. That shit's just unacceptable...

Chrysanthemum said...

mmmm.... pork rinds...

kristin said...

I can hear the doctor now...

"Damnit! 'Pork rinds' were on the list of things to bring TO the surgery, not be involved IN the surgery. Doctors have hangover cravings too, ya know."

Lever said...

I can picture the operating theatre...

"Scalpel"
"tongs"
"pork rinds"

Is it the lack of hyphenation in nonpenetrating or the missing query? ???

Kat E said...

I don't think nonpenetrating has to be hyphenated. The question mark was missing, though the commas you see were added by me, so it was even worse punctuation-wise before. And I think it should be "the outflow", not "to outflow". But my guess is as good as yours at this point.